University of California Center for Accelerated Innovation

Therapeutic Discovery & Development Series

Drug Discovery Capital and Time

How long does it take to go from the bench to the clinic?
What are the capital requirements at each stage?

This seminar series provides an introduction to strategic and tactical planning for small molecule and antibody therapeutics. Those who attend the four sessions will understand how to determine unmet need, evaluate the competitive landscape, use integrative translational informatics to pick targets, manage a complicated interdisciplinary process, and plan for an optimal commercial exit. This series is appropriate for graduate students, post-docs and faculty who conduct or plan to conduct translational science focused on drug development - and it is also one of the few courses to provide instruction in drug development specifically for biomedical researchers.

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Business Development and IP

What does your project look like?
What are similar products that have exited?
What were the deal terms for other similar projects?
Who are likely partners?
How do you integrate science, IP, and business?

This seminar series provides an introduction to strategic and tactical planning for small molecule and antibody therapeutics. Those who attend the four sessions will understand how to determine unmet need, evaluate the competitive landscape, use integrative translational informatics to pick targets, manage a complicated interdisciplinary process, and plan for an optimal commercial exit. This series is appropriate for graduate students, post-docs and faculty who conduct or plan to conduct translational science focused on drug development - and it is also one of the few courses to provide instruction in drug development specifically for biomedical researchers.

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Intellectual Property

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Suzannah K. Sundby is the Managing Partner of Washington DC at Canady + Lortz LLP.

Ms. Sundby practices all aspects of intellectual property law including patent preparation, and prosecution, licensing, opinion work, client counseling, and litigation relating to diverse technologies including biochemistry, molecular biology, pharmaceuticals, microfluidics, diagnostics, medical devices, and nanotechnology.  Ms. Sundby has experience assisting start-up biotech companies with the preparation and prosecution of their foundation patents, nondisclosure agreements and related IP issues. 

Ms. Sundby is the Chair of the Biotechnology Committee of the American Intellectual Property Law Association.

Ms. Sundby taught advanced biotech patent preparation and prosecution as an Adjunct Professor at Franklin Pierce Law Center.  Before entering the legal field, Ms. Sundby helped map the Drosophila genome as a member of the University of California's Berkeley Drosophila Genome Group.

Ms. Sundby holds a B.S. in Biochemistry/Molecular Biology and, in addition to earning a Juris Doctor, she earned a Master of Intellectual Property.


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Speakers

David Read, Esq.
Partner, Bartle Read

Suzannah K. Sundby, Esq.
Partner, Canady + Lortz LLP

Description:

Is absolute novelty really absolute?
How strict is strict basis?
What can’t be patented in Europe as compared to the US?
Are assignments necessary for a valid patent?

This webinar led by David Read, Esq, Partner at Bartle Read, and Suzannah K. Sundby, Esq, Partner at Canady + Lortz, LLP, provides an overview on differences between US and European patent laws and the impact on patent protection.


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In vitro toxicity assays for small molecule development

The development of a novel drug is an expensive and time consuming endeavor. While the discovery of hits from a high throughput screening (HTS) campaign is relatively successful, later compound development stages have a much higher attrition rate. In this context, toxicity evaluation is one of the most important aspects of drug development. In this symposium, we hope to give an overview of the basic aspects of in vitro toxicity testing. We will focus on oxidative stress and small molecule-induced liver injury, one of the main reasons for withdrawal of drugs from the market. This symposium aims at investigators who have no prior background in drug development and is intended to provide a forum where they can learn about early toxicity evaluation of small molecules from experts. We also hope that this symposium will start the discussion towards the development of a more standardized approach to in vitro toxicity testing.

Robert Damoiseaux, Ph.D.
Director of the Molecular Shared Screening Resources (MSSR) at the California NanoSystems Institute of UCLA

The ROS/ATP ratio predicts accurately clinically severe drug induced liver injury in cultures of primary human hepatocytes

The development of a novel drug is an expensive and time consuming endeavor. While the discovery of hits from a high throughput screening (HTS) campaign is relatively successful, later compound development stages have a much higher attrition rate. In this context, toxicity evaluation is one of the most important aspects of drug development. In this symposium, we hope to give an overview of the basic aspects of in vitro toxicity testing. We will focus on oxidative stress and small molecule-induced liver injury, one of the main reasons for withdrawal of drugs from the market. This symposium aims at investigators who have no prior background in drug development and is intended to provide a forum where they can learn about early toxicity evaluation of small molecules from experts. We also hope that this symposium will start the discussion towards the development of a more standardized approach to in vitro toxicity testing.

Jie Zhang
Statistician at the FDA's National Center for Toxicological Research Division of Bioinformatics and Biostatistics

Illuminating cytotoxicity and cell viability with in vitro assay chemistries

The development of a novel drug is an expensive and time consuming endeavor. While the discovery of hits from a high throughput screening (HTS) campaign is relatively successful, later compound development stages have a much higher attrition rate. In this context, toxicity evaluation is one of the most important aspects of drug development. In this symposium, we hope to give an overview of the basic aspects of in vitro toxicity testing. We will focus on oxidative stress and small molecule-induced liver injury, one of the main reasons for withdrawal of drugs from the market. This symposium aims at investigators who have no prior background in drug development and is intended to provide a forum where they can learn about early toxicity evaluation of small molecules from experts. We also hope that this symposium will start the discussion towards the development of a more standardized approach to in vitro toxicity testing.

Jim Cali, Ph.D.
Research Director for the Division of Assay Design at Promega

Questions?

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